Condusiv Technologies Blog

Condusiv Technologies Blog

Blogging @Condusiv

The Condusiv blog shares insight into the issues surrounding system and application performance—and how I/O optimization software is breaking new ground in solving those issues.

My last entry

by Helpdesk 11. April 2006 14:07
Regarding my last entry: Someone pointed out (correctly) that the article from Microsoft was not in fact new. I had picked it up on my google alerts and had some difficulty verifying the date it was written. I offer my apologies for the mistake. I also want to point out that some of the commenters on my entry are confused about free space defragmentation. All 3rd party defragmenters defragment free space. Everyone agrees that it needs to be defragmented. The only question is to what degree. Some in the industry have promoted free space "consolidation" or the putting of all the free space into one-pool as an attempt at product differentiation. We disagree with this approach of putting it into one-pool, and always have. Has Diskeeper improved over the years at free space defragmentation? Yes. Should we suddenly switch to "consolidate" free space into one-pool? No. The point of my last post was to point out that the one-pool philosophy is incorrect. Going the extra mile to put all of the free space into one-pool is a waste of resources as it only temporarily creates a pretty disk map. In the article I referenced, Microsoft also endorses a different approach when they state that free space should be in, "a few contiguous portions of the disk." I will let the Diskeeper Product Manager Michael elaborate further.

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In the Oven

by Michael 24. March 2006 12:43
Here's a couple of development projects in the works. Diskeeper Server Enterprise Edition will be adding support for the Intel Itanium platform in the next few weeks. Speaking of Intel, you may be aware that we have a partnership with them and some flavors of Diskeeper ship with their motherboards in the Desktop Utilities CD. That relationship is expanding with the upcoming release of their newest boards later this year. Customers will get to enjoy a special joint software offer from Intel and Diskeeper (on both Servers and Desktops). Stay tuned. Another in-progress development project is "I-FAAST 2.0" (code-name). There are big plans for the continuing development of I-FAAST, which will continue in parallel with other Diskeeper enhancements. I-FAAST 2.0 is currently planned for inclusion in the next major version release of Diskeeper. I-FAAST is, to briefly review, the disk performance calibration technology first introduced in Diskeeper 10. It sequences the most frequently used files to speed up thier access, and it takes measures to speed up new file writes as well. Unlike other applications of file ordering strategies, this one can be scientifically proven to increase performance- no marketing smoke-and-mirrors and no theoretical mumbo-jumbo; just results. Visit our knowledge center and check out the "Benchmarking I-FAAST" report.

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Apples to Apples

by Michael 23. March 2006 20:55
Following up on Paul's recent posting on free space consolidation, I felt the following blog has some relevance. Please note that Paul's post has received quite a bit of feedback and I will respond to that in the next few days, time permitting, because it is a very involved subject. Just over three years ago Gartner, a leading IT Analyst group published a report on defragmentation, and specifically the impact of defragmentation methodologies on free space fragmentation. Gartner enjoys a well-earned reputation for quality and accuracy of its reports, and this typically is the case. However, they do on rare occasion make mistakes. I will play devil's advocate and argue a particular little misstep in this report. Keep in mind that the information about the built-in defragmenter is correct; however, the broader conclusion derived from data applies flawed logic.

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Microsoft and Diskeeper Agree on Free Space Defrag

by Helpdesk 17. March 2006 16:47
There has been some confusion in the past regarding free space defragmentation. Some people in the industry believed that after a defragmentation job free space should be consolidated into one pool. Here at Diskeeper Corporation we have long since maintained that this doesn't make sense (see our whitepaper on this very subject). Moving free space into one consolidated pool is a temporary condition that wastes resources and serves no purpose. Instead free space should be grouped in a few contiguous pools. I was happy to see Microsoft has recently validated our longstanding position. Checkout the section on free space fragmentation in the new Microsoft TechNet article, Maintaining Windows 2000 Peak Performance through Defragmentation: "Free Space Fragmentation A partially full disk contains unused space, known as free space. Ideally, this space would be available in a few contiguous portions of the disk." -Microsoft TechNet -Paul

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New Microsoft Defragmentation Recommendations

by Michael 15. March 2006 18:10
A new Microsoft TechNet article, Maintaining Windows 2000 Peak Performance through Defragmentation, was recently published. The article provides a very good overview on disk fragmentation. From 2005 to 2006 Microsoft has improved dramatically in their defrag schedule recommendations, switching from the outdated monthly rule of thumb to recommending a weekly schedule. While Microsoft's recent schedule recommendation is a big improvement, it doesn't go far enough. In this article Microsoft makes the observation that, "normal, day-to-day use of your computer will cause fragmentation". Even a desktop in a client-server environment (where the data resides on a file server) can see 1,000+ fragments build up on its local disk drive in a single day. Worse yet these fragmented files are probably among a small set of files you use the most. A daily schedule is really the way to go. A daily defrag schedule keeps your defragmentation jobs short and handles fragmentation as it occurs, ensuring no losses in performance.

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