Condusiv Technologies Blog

Condusiv Technologies Blog

Blogging @Condusiv

The Condusiv blog shares insight into the issues surrounding system and application performance—and how I/O optimization software is breaking new ground in solving those issues.

V-locity I/O Reduction Software Put to the Test on 3500 VMs

by Brian Morin 17. March 2016 04:18

As much as we commonly mention the expected performance gains from V-locity® I/O reduction software is 50-300% faster application performance, that 50-300% can represent quite a range - a correlation relative to how badly systems are taxed by I/O inefficiencies in virtual environments that are subsequently streamlined by V-locity. While some workloads experience 300% throughput gains, other workloads in the same environment see 50% gains.

While there is already plenty of V-locity performance validation represented in 15 published case studies that all reveal a doubling in VM performance, we wanted to get an idea of what V-locity delivers on average across a large scale. So we decided to take off our “rose-colored” glasses of what we think our software does and handed over the last 3,450 VMs that tested V-locity to ESG Labs, who examined the raw data from over 100 sites and PUBLISHED THE FINDINGS IN THIS REPORT.

Here are the key findings:

·         Reduced read I/O to storage. ESG Lab calculated 55% of systems saw a reduction of 50% in the number of read I/Os that get serviced by the underlying storage

·         Reduced write I/O to storage. As a result of I/O density increases, ESG Lab witnessed a 33% reduction in write I/Os across 27% of the systems. In addition, 14% of systems experienced a 50% or greater reduction in write I/O from VM (virtual machine) to storage.

·         Increased throughput. ESG Lab witnessed throughput performance improvements of 50% or more for 43% of systems, while 29% of systems experienced a 100% increase in throughput, and as much as 300% increased levels of throughput for 8% of systems.

·         Decreased I/O response time. ESG Lab calculated that systems with 3GB of available DRAM achieved a 40% reduction in response time across all I/O operations.

·         Increased IOPS. ESG Lab found that 25% of systems saw IOPS increase by 50% or more.

 

The key take-away from this analysis is demonstrating the sizeable performance loss virtualized organizations suffer in regard to I/O inefficiencies that can be easily solved by V-locity streamlining I/O at the guest level on Windows VMs. Whereas most organizations typically respond to I/O performance issues by taking the brute-force approach of throwing more expensive hardware at the problem, V-locity demonstrates the efficiencies organizations achieve at a fraction of the cost of new hardware by simply solving the root-cause problem first.

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SAN | virtualization | V-Locity

Largest-Ever I/O Performance Study

by Brian Morin 28. January 2016 09:10

Over the last year, 2,654 IT Professionals took our industry-first I/O Performance Survey, which makes it the largest I/O performance survey of its kind. The key findings from the survey reveal an I/O performance struggle for virtualized organizations as 77% of all respondents indicated I/O performance issues after virtualizing. The full 17 page report is available for download at http://learn.condusiv.com/2015survey.html.

Key findings in the survey include:

- More than 1/3rd of respondents (36%) are currently experiencing staff or customer complaints regarding sluggish applications running on MS SQL or Oracle

- Nearly 1/3rd of respondents (28%) are so limited by I/O bottlenecks that they have reached an "I/O ceiling" and are unable to scale their virtualized infrastructure

- To improve I/O performance since virtualizing, 51% purchased a new SAN, 8% purchased PCIe flash cards, 17% purchased server-side SSDs, 27% purchased storage-side SSDs, 16% purchased more SAS spindles,       6% purchased a hyper-converged appliance

- In the coming year, to remediate I/O bottlenecks, 25% plan to purchase a new SAN, 8% plan to purchase a hyper-converged appliance, 10% will purchase SAS spindles, 16% will purchases server-side SSDs, 8% will   purchase PCIe flash cards, 27% will purchase storage-side SSDs, 35% will purchase nothing in the coming year

- Over 1,000 applications were named when asked to identify the top two most challenging applications to support from a systems performance standpoint. Everything in the top 10 was an application running on top of   a database

- 71% agree that improving the performance of one or two applications via inexpensive I/O reduction software to avoid a forklift upgrade is either important or urgent for their environment

As much as virtualization has provided cost-savings and improved efficiency at the server-level, those cost savings are typically traded-off for backend storage infrastructure upgrades to handle the new IOPS requirements from virtualized workloads. This is due to I/O characteristics that are much smaller, more fractured, and more random than they need to be.  The added complexity that virtualization introduces to the data path via the “I/O blender” effect that randomizes I/O from disparate VMs, and the amplification of Windows write inefficiencies at the logical disk layer erodes the relationship between I/O and data, generating a flood of small, fractured I/O. This compounding effect between the I/O blender and Windows write inefficiencies creates “death by a thousand cuts” regarding system performance, creating the perfect trifecta for poor performance – small, fractured, random I/O.

Since native virtualization out-of-the box does nothing to solve this problem, organizations are left with little choice but accept the loss of throughput from these inefficiencies and overbuy and overprovision for performance from an IOPS standpoint since they are twice as IOPS dependent than they actually need to be…except for Condusiv customers who are using V-locity® I/O reduction software to see 50-300% faster application performance on the hardware they already have by solving this root cause problem at the VM OS-layer.

Note - Respondents from companies with employee sizes under 100 employees were excluded from the results, so results would not be skewed by the low end of the SMB market.

V-locity 6.0 Solves Death by a Thousand Cuts in Virtual Environments

by Brian Morin 12. August 2015 08:04

If you haven’t already heard the pre-announcement buzz on V-locity® 6.0 I/O reduction software that made a splash in the press, it’s being released in a couple weeks. To understand why it’s significant and why it’s an unprecedented 3X FASTER than its predecessor is to understand the biggest factor that dampens application performance the most in virtual environments - the problem of increasingly smaller, fractured, and random I/O. That kind of I/O profile is akin to pouring molasses on compute and storage systems. Processing I/O with those characteristics makes systems work much harder than necessary to process any given workload. Virtualized organizations stymied by sluggish performance related to their most I/O intensive applications suffer in large part to a problem that we call “death by a thousand cuts” – I/O that is smaller, more fractured, and more random than it needs to be.

Organizations tend to overlook solving the problem and reactively attempt to mask the problem with more spindles or flash or a forklift storage upgrade. Unfortunately, this approach wastes much of any new investment in flash since optimal performance is being robbed by I/O inefficiencies at the Windows OS layer and also at the hypervisor layer.

V-locity® version 6 has been built from the ground-up to help organizations solve their toughest application performance challenges without new hardware. This is accomplished by optimizing the I/O profile for greater throughput while also targeting the smallest, random I/O that is cached from available DRAM to reduce latency and rid the infrastructure of the kind of I/O that penalizes performance the most.

Although much is made about V-locity’s patented IntelliWrite® engine that increases I/O density and sequentializes writes, special attention was put into V-locity’s DRAM read caching engine (IntelliMemory®) that is now 3X more efficient in version 6 due to changes in the behavioral analytics engine that focuses on "caching effectiveness" instead of "cache hits.”

Leveraging available server-side DRAM for caching is very different than leveraging a dedicated flash resource for cache whether that be PCI-e or SSD. Although DRAM isn’t capacity intensive, it is exponentially faster than a PCI-e or SSD cache sitting below it, which makes it the ideal tier for the first caching tier in the infrastructure. The trick is in knowing how to best use a capacity-limited but blazing fast storage medium.

Commodity algorithms that simply look at characteristics like access frequency might work for  capacity intensive caches, but it doesn’t work for DRAM. V-locity 6.0 determines the best use of DRAM for caching purposes by collecting data on a wide range of data points (storage access, frequency, I/O priority, process priority, types of I/O, nature of I/O (sequential or random), time between I/Os) - then leverages its analytics engine to identify which storage blocks will benefit the most from caching, which also reduces "cache churn" and the repeated recycling of cache blocks. By prioritizing the smallest, random I/O to be served from DRAM, V-locity eliminates the most performance robbing I/O from traversing the infrastructure. Administrators don’t need to be concerned about carving out precious DRAM for caching purposes as V-locity dynamically leverages available DRAM. With a mere 4GB of RAM per VM, we’ve seen gains from 50% to well over 600%, depending on the I/O profile.

With V-locity 5, we examined data from 2576 systems that tested V-locity and shared their before/after data with Condusiv servers. From that raw data, we verified that 43% of all systems experienced greater than 50% reduction in latency on reads due to IntelliMemory. While that’s a significant number in its own right by simply using available DRAM, we can’t wait to see how that number jumps significantly for our customers with V-locity 6.

Internal Iometer tests reveal that the latest version of IntelliMemory in V-locity 6.0 is 3.6X faster when processing 4K blocks and 2.0X faster when processing 64K blocks.

Jim Miller, Senior Analyst, Enterprise Management Associates had this to say, "V-locity version 6.0 makes a very compelling argument for server-side DRAM caching by targeting small, random I/O - the culprit that dampens performance the most. This approach helps organizations improve business productivity by better utilizing the available DRAM they already have. However, considering the price evolution of DRAM, its speed, and proximity to the processor, some organizations may want to add additional memory for caching if they have data sets hungry for otherworldly performance gains."

Finally, one of our customers, Rich Reitenauer, Manager of Infrastructure Management and Support, Alvernia University, had this to say, "Typical IT administrators respond to application performance issues by reactively throwing more expensive server and storage hardware at them, without understanding what the real problem is. Higher education budgets can't afford that kind of brute-force approach. By trying V-locity I/O reduction software first, we were able to double the performance of our LMS app sitting on SQL, stop all complaints about performance, stop the application from timing out on students, and avoid an expensive forklift hardware upgrade."

For more on the I/O Inefficiencies that V-locity solves, read Storage Switzerland’s Briefing on V-locity 6.0 ->

3 Min Video on SAN Misconceptions Regarding Fragmentation

by Brian Morin 23. June 2015 08:56

In just 3 minutes, George Crump, Sr Analyst at Storage Switzerland, explains the real problem around fragmentation and SAN storage, debunks misconceptions, and describes what organizations are doing about it. It should be noted, that even though he is speaking about the Windows OS on physical servers, the problem is the same for virtual servers connected to SAN storage. Watch ->

In conversations we have with SAN storage administrators and even storage vendors, it usually takes some time for someone to realize that performance-robbing Windows fragmentation does occur, but the problem is not what you think. It has nothing to do with the physical layer under SAN management or latency from physical disk head movement. 

When people think of fragmentation, they typically think in the context of physical blocks on a mechanical disk. However, in a SAN environment, the Windows OS is abstracted from the physical layer. The Windows OS manages the logical disk software layer and the SAN manages how the data is physically written to disk or solid-state.

What this means is that the SAN device has no control or influence on how data is written to the logical disk. In the video, George Crump describes how fragmentation is inherent to the fabric of Windows and what actually happens when a file is written to the logical disk in a fragmented manner – I/Os become fractured and it takes more I/O than necessary to process any given file. As a result, SAN systems are overloaded with a small, fractured, random I/O, which dampens overall performance. The I/O overhead from a fragmented logical disk impacts SAN storage populated with flash equally as much as a system populated with disk.

The video doesn’t have time to go into why this actually happens, so here is a brief explanation: 

Since the Windows OS takes a one-size-fits-all approach to all environments, the OS is not aware of file sizes. What that means is the OS does not look for the proper size allocation within the logical disk when writing or extending a file. It simply looks for the next available allocation. If the available address is not large enough, the OS splits the file and looks for the next available address, fills, and splits again until the whole file is written. The resulting problem in a SAN environment with flash or disk is that a dedicated I/O operation is required to process every piece of the file. In George’s example, it could take 25 I/O operations to process a file that could have otherwise been processed with a single I/O. We see customer examples of severe fragmentation where a single file has been fractured into thousands of pieces at the logical layer. It’s akin to pouring molasses on a SAN system.

Since a defragmentation process only deals with the problem after-the-fact and is not an option on a modern, production SAN without taking it offline, Condusiv developed its patented IntelliWrite® technology within both Diskeeper® and V-locity® that prevents I/Os from fracturing in the first place. IntelliWrite provides intelligence to the Windows OS to help it find the proper size allocation within the logical disk instead of the next available allocation. This enables files to be written (and read) in a more contiguous and sequential manner, so only minimum I/O is required of any workload from server to storage. This increases throughput on existing systems so organizations can get peak performance from the SSDs or mechanical disks they already have, and avoid overspending on expensive hardware to combat performance problems that can be so easily solved.

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SAN Fragmentation Controversy Incites Attack from NetApp

by Brian Morin 22. April 2015 08:38

I can’t blame it all on NetApp.

It all started with THIS TWEET.

I’ll admit NetApp was misled by an inadvertent title from a well-intentioned editor at Searchstorage.com, but the CTO Office at NetApp obviously didn’t read the whole article beyond the headline.

Dave Raffo, the Senior News Director for Search Storage wrote a feature article on the FUD surrounding SAN and fragmentation and how the latest release of Diskeeper® 15 Server eliminates performance-robbing fragmentation without “defragging.” In fact, here is one of Dave’s direct quotes from the article:

“It’s not defragging disks in SAN arrays, but preventing files from being broken into pieces before being written to hard disk drives or solid-state drives non-sequentially. That way, it prevents fragmentation before it becomes an issue.”

Unfortunately, the word “defrag” was inadvertently put into the headline and opening sentence of the article, which triggered a knee jerk reaction from the CTO Office at NetApp who tweeted, “NetApp does not recommend using defragmentation software on our kit, period.”

Attention all SAN vendors: Diskeeper 15 Server is not a “defrag” utility! 

Diskeeper 15 proactively prevents fragmentation from occurring in the first place at the Windows file system level. As a result, Diskeeper is not competing with RAID controllers for physical block management or triggering copy-on-write activity by moving blocks like a traditional “defrag.” Instead, Diskeeper 15 Server complements the SAN by making sure it no longer receives small, fractured random I/O from Windows. This patented approach reduces the IOPS requirement for any given workload and improves throughput on existing systems from physical server to storage, so administrators can get more from the systems they have by moving more data in less time. 

We find it takes someone a few minutes to stop thinking in terms of “defragging” after-the-fact and start thinking in terms of how much a SAN can benefit from fragmentation prevention. Here’s some recent media coverage snippets that explain:

“As Condusiv demonstrates, the level of fragmentation of the logical disk inflates the IOPS requirement for any given workload with a surplus of small, fractured I/O. While part of the performance problem can be hidden behind high performance flash, a high fragmented environment wastes much of the investment in flash.” – Storage Switzerland, full article ->

“Businesses that are switching over to flash arrays should see a benefit as well. Since fragmentation at the logical layer is inherent in the fabric of Windows, the flash technology will still have a higher I/O overhead. Diskeeper will help organizations switching to flash get the most for their investments.” – Storage Review, full article ->

“Diskeeper 15 Server is the first fragmentation protection for SAN storage connected to physical servers. It prevents fragmentation in real time at the logical disk layer, increasing IO density so more data can be processed.” – Channel Buzz, full article ->

“Condusiv's Diskeeper 15 extends the benefits of defragmentation out to the SAN with the novel technique of reducing fragmentation before the data leaves the server.” – Tom’s IT Pro, full article ->

“Condusiv has added a new twist to its Diskeeper line…by tackling for the first time the question of how to defragment SAN storage.” – CRN, full article ->

Keep in mind, those who want to make sure their virtualized workloads connected to SAN are optimized as well can use V-locity® I/O reduction for virtual servers. With V-locity, users get the added benefit of server-side DRAM caching to further reduce I/O to storage and satisfy data even quicker.

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