Condusiv Technologies Blog

Condusiv Technologies Blog

Blogging @Condusiv

The Condusiv blog shares insight into the issues surrounding system and application performance—and how I/O optimization software is breaking new ground in solving those issues.

New Partner Portal!!!

by Helpdesk 9. August 2006 13:31
If you currently resell software or have considered reselling, checkout our newly launched partner portal. If you want to partner with Diskeeper, ideally you would register and get a login, but you don't need one. From the main page click the "Software" link at the top, or simply go to this page and follow the nav on the left. We have overhauled the site providing more resources and promotions to make it easier for partners to make money with Diskeeper. As part of our growing effort to extend more personalized service to our partners, we have an excellent page allowing one to rapidly get in touch with the Diskeeper employee that handles your specific needs. -Paul

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General | General

Who uses Diskeeper?

by Helpdesk 14. July 2006 14:26
Apparently a lot of people do! Diskeeper recently surpassed the 20 million licenses sold mark. -Paul

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General

Virtual Server Defrag Heating Up

by Helpdesk 20. April 2006 16:47
Virtual server defragmentation is getting even more attention with the media coverage of our recent partnership initiative with Microsoft. In case anybody missed it, Microsoft's recent announcement mentioned us as one of their key partners involved in pushing forward virtualization technology. See articles in Redmond Magazine, InformationWeek, and CRN. Many IT professionals are currently using Diskeeper to defragment Virtual Server 2005 and VMWare with much success, however there is still work to be done to ensure that the most thorough defragmentation job can be achieved on the host and virtual levels. These technical challenges are why Microsoft has tapped us yet again to push forward defragmentation technology on the Windows platform. Server virtualization has the effect of making the mechanical disk drive an even bigger bottleneck. As I've said before on this blog, automatic defragmentation should play a key part in your virtualization strategy. —Paul

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General

My last entry

by Helpdesk 11. April 2006 14:07
Regarding my last entry: Someone pointed out (correctly) that the article from Microsoft was not in fact new. I had picked it up on my google alerts and had some difficulty verifying the date it was written. I offer my apologies for the mistake. I also want to point out that some of the commenters on my entry are confused about free space defragmentation. All 3rd party defragmenters defragment free space. Everyone agrees that it needs to be defragmented. The only question is to what degree. Some in the industry have promoted free space "consolidation" or the putting of all the free space into one-pool as an attempt at product differentiation. We disagree with this approach of putting it into one-pool, and always have. Has Diskeeper improved over the years at free space defragmentation? Yes. Should we suddenly switch to "consolidate" free space into one-pool? No. The point of my last post was to point out that the one-pool philosophy is incorrect. Going the extra mile to put all of the free space into one-pool is a waste of resources as it only temporarily creates a pretty disk map. In the article I referenced, Microsoft also endorses a different approach when they state that free space should be in, "a few contiguous portions of the disk." I will let the Diskeeper Product Manager Michael elaborate further.

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General

Microsoft and Diskeeper Agree on Free Space Defrag

by Helpdesk 17. March 2006 16:47
There has been some confusion in the past regarding free space defragmentation. Some people in the industry believed that after a defragmentation job free space should be consolidated into one pool. Here at Diskeeper Corporation we have long since maintained that this doesn't make sense (see our whitepaper on this very subject). Moving free space into one consolidated pool is a temporary condition that wastes resources and serves no purpose. Instead free space should be grouped in a few contiguous pools. I was happy to see Microsoft has recently validated our longstanding position. Checkout the section on free space fragmentation in the new Microsoft TechNet article, Maintaining Windows 2000 Peak Performance through Defragmentation: "Free Space Fragmentation A partially full disk contains unused space, known as free space. Ideally, this space would be available in a few contiguous portions of the disk." -Microsoft TechNet -Paul

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General

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