Condusiv Technologies Blog

Condusiv Technologies Blog

Blogging @Condusiv

The Condusiv blog shares insight into the issues surrounding system and application performance—and how I/O optimization software is breaking new ground in solving those issues.

Financial Sector Battered by Rising Compliance Costs

by Dawn Richcreek 15. August 2018 08:39

Finance is already an outlier in terms of IT costs. The industry devotes 10.5% of total revenue to IT—and on average, each financial industry IT staffer supports only 15.7 users, the fewest of any industry.

All over the world, financial services companies are facing skyrocketing compliance costs. Almost half the respondents to a recent Accenture survey of compliance officers in 13 countries said they expected 10% to 20% increases, and nearly one in five are expecting increases of more than 20%.

Much of this is driven by international banking regulations. At the beginning of this year, the Common Reporting Standard went into effect. An anti-tax-evasion measure signed by 142 countries, the CRS requires financial institutions to provide detailed account information to the home governments of virtually every sizeable depositor.

Just to keep things exciting, the U.S. government hasn’t signed on to CRS; instead we require banks doing business with Americans to comply with the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act of 2010. Which requires—surprise, surprise—pretty much the same thing as CRS, but reported differently.

And these are just two examples of the compliance burden the financial sector must deal with. Efficiently, and within a budget. In a recent interview by ValueWalk entitled “Compliance Costs Soaring for Financial Institutions,” Condusiv® CEO Jim D’Arezzo said, “Financial firms must find a path to more sustainable compliance costs.”

Speaking to the site’s audience (ValueWalk is a site focused on hedge funds, large asset managers, and value investing) D’Arezzo noted that finance is already an outlier in terms of IT costs. The industry devotes 10.5% of total revenue to IT, more than government, healthcare, retail, or anybody else. It’s also an outlier in terms of IT staff load; on average, each financial industry IT staffer supports only 15.7 users, the fewest of any industry. (Government averages 37.8 users per IT staff employee.)

To ease these difficulties, D’Arezzo recommends that the financial industry consider advanced technologies that provide cost-effective ways to enhance overall system performance. “The only way financial services companies will be able to meet the compliance demands being placed on them, and at the same time meet their efficiency and profitability targets, will be to improve the efficiency of their existing capacity—especially as regards I/O reduction.”

At Condusiv, that’s our business. We’ve seen users of our I/O reduction software solutions increase the capability of their storage and servers, including SQL servers, by 30% to 50% or more. In some cases, we’ve seen results as high as 10X initial performance—without the need to purchase a single box of new hardware.

If you’re interested in working with a firm that can reduce your two biggest silent killers of SQL performance, request a demo with an I/O performance specialist now.

 

For an explanation of why your heaviest workloads are only processing half the throughput they should from VM to storage, view this short video.

 

Doing it All: The Internet of Things and the Data Tsunami

by Dawn Richcreek 7. August 2018 15:44

“If you’re a CIO today, basically you have no choice. You have to do edge computing and cloud computing, and you have to do them within budgets that don’t allow for wholesale hardware replacement…”

For a while there, it looked like corporate IT resource planning was going to be easy. Organizations would move practically everything to the cloud, lean on their cloud service suppliers to maintain performance, cut back on operating expenses for local computing, and reduce—or at least stabilize—overall cost.

Unfortunately, that prediction didn’t reckon with the Internet of Things (IoT), which, in terms of both size and importance, is exploding.

What’s the “edge?”

It varies. To a telecom, the edge could be a cell phone, or a cell tower. To a manufacturer, it could be a machine on a shop floor. To a hospital, it could be a pacemaker. What’s important is that edge computing allows data to be analyzed in near real time, allowing actions to take place at a speed that would be impossible in a cloud-based environment. 

(Consider, for example, a self-driving car. The onboard optics spot a baby carriage in an upcoming crosswalk. There isn’t time for that information to be sent upstream to a cloud-based application, processed, and an instruction returned before slamming on the brakes.)

Meanwhile, the need for massive data processing and analytics continues to grow, creating a kind of digital arms race between data creation and the ability to store and analyze it. In the life sciences, for instance, it’s estimated that only 5% of the data ever created has been analyzed.

Condusiv® CEO Jim D’Arezzo was interviewed by App Development magazine (which publishes news to 50,000 IT pros) on this very topic, in an article entitled “Edge computing has a need for speed.” Noting that edge computing is predicted to grow at a CAGR of 46% between now and 2022, Jim said, “If you’re a CIO today, basically you have no choice. You have to do edge computing and cloud computing, and you have to do them within budgets that don’t allow for wholesale hardware replacement. For that to happen, your I/O capacity and SQL performance need to be optimized. And, given the realities of edge computing, so do your desktops and laptops.”

At Condusiv, we’ve seen users of our I/O reduction software solutions increase the capability of their storage and servers, including SQL servers, by 30% to 50% or more. In some cases, we’ve seen results as high as 10X initial performance—without the need to purchase a single box of new hardware.

If you’re interested in working with a firm that can reduce your two biggest silent killers of SQL performance, request a demo with an I/O performance specialist now.

If you want to hear why your heaviest workloads are only processing half the throughput they should from VM to storage, view this short video.

A Deep Dive Into The I/O Performance Dashboard

by Howard Butler 2. August 2018 08:36

While most users are familiar with the main Diskeeper®/V-locity®/SSDkeeper™ Dashboard view which focuses on the number of I/Os eliminated and Storage I/O Time Saved, the I/O Performance Dashboard tab takes a deeper look into the performance characteristics of I/O activity.  The data shown here is similar in nature to other Windows performance monitoring utilities and provides a wealth of data on I/O traffic streams. 

By default, the information displayed is from the time the product was installed. You can easily filter this down to a different time frame by clicking on the “Since Installation” picklist and choosing a different time frame such as Last 24 Hours, Last 7 Days, Last 30 Days, Last 60 Days, Last 90 Days, or Last 180 Days.  The data displayed will automatically be updated to reflect the time frame selected.

 

The first section of the display above is labeled as “I/O Performance Metrics” and you will see values that represent Average, Minimum, and Maximum values for I/Os Per Second (IOPS), throughput measured in Megabytes per Second (MB/Sec) and application I/O Latency measured in milliseconds (msecs). Diskeeper, V-locity and SSDkeeper use the Windows high performance system counters to gather this data and it is measured down to the microsecond (1/1,000,000 second).

While most people are familiar with IOPS and throughput expressed in MB/Sec, I will give a short description just to make sure. 

IOPS is the number of I/Os completed in 1 second of time.  This is a measurement of both read and write I/O operations.  MB/Sec is a measurement that reflects the amount of data being worked on and passed through the system.  Taken together they represent speed and throughput efficiency.  One thing I want to point out is that the Latency value shown in the above report is not measured at the storage device, but instead is a much more accurate reflection of I/O response time at an application level.  This is where the rubber meets the road.  Each I/O that passes through the Windows storage driver has a start and completion time stamp.  The difference between these two values measures the real-world elapsed time for how long it takes an I/O to complete and be handed back to the application for further processing.  Measurements at the storage device do not account for network, host, and hypervisor congestion.  Therefore, our Latency value is a much more meaningful value than typical hardware counters for I/O response time or latency.  In this display, we also provide meaningful data on the percentage of I/O traffic- which are reads and which are writes.  This helps to better gauge which of our technologies (IntelliMemory® or IntelliWrite®) is likely to provide the greatest benefit.

The next section of the display measures the “Total Workload” in terms of the amount of data accessed for both reads and writes as well as any data satisfied from cache. 

 

A system which has higher workloads as compared to other systems in your environment are the ones that likely have higher I/O traffic and tend to cause more of the I/O blender effect when connected to a shared SAN storage or virtualized environment and are prime candidates for the extra I/O capacity relief that Diskeeper, V-locity and SSDkeeper provide.

Now moving into the third section of the display labeled as “Memory Usage” we see some measurements that represent the Total Memory in the system and the total amount of I/O data that has been satisfied from the IntelliMemory cache.  The purpose of our patented read caching technology is twofold.  Satisfy from cache the frequently repetitive read data requests and be aware of the small read operations that tend to cause excessive “noise” in the I/O stream to storage and satisfy them from the cache.  So, it’s not uncommon to see the “Data Satisfied from Cache” compared to the “Total Workload” to be a bit lower than other types of caching algorithms.  Storage arrays tend to do quite well when handed large sequential I/O traffic but choke when small random reads and writes are part of the mix.  Eliminating I/O traffic from going to storage is what it’s all about.  The fewer I/Os to storage, the faster and more data your applications will be able to access.

In addition, we show the average, minimum, and maximum values for free memory used by the cache.  For each of these values, the corresponding Total Free Memory in Cache for the system is shown (Total Free Memory is memory used by the cache plus memory reported by the system as free).  The memory values will be displayed in a yellow color font if the size of the cache is being severely restricted due to the current memory demands of other applications and preventing our product from providing maximum I/O benefit.  The memory values will be displayed in red if the Total Memory is less than 3GB.

Read I/O traffic, which is potentially cacheable, can receive an additional benefit by adding more DRAM for the cache and allowing the IntelliMemory caching technology to satisfy a greater amount of that read I/O traffic at the speed of DRAM (10-15 times faster than SSD), offloading it away from the slower back-end storage. This would have the effect of further reducing average storage I/O latency and saving even more storage I/O time.

Additional Note: For machines running SQL Server or Microsoft Exchange, you will likely need to cap the amount of memory that those applications can use (if you haven’t done so already), to prevent them from ‘stealing’ any additional memory that you add to those machines.

It should be noted the IntelliMemory read cache is dynamic and self-learning.  This means you do not need to pre-allocate a fixed amount of memory to the cache or run some pre-assessment tool or discovery utility to determine what should be loaded into cache.  IntelliMemory will only use memory that is otherwise, free, available, or unused memory for its cache and will always leave plenty of memory untouched (1.5GB – 4GB depending on the total system memory) and available for Windows and other applications to use.  As there is a demand for memory, IntelliMemory will release memory from it’s cache and give this memory back to Windows so there will not be a memory shortage.  There is further intelligence with the IntelliMemory caching technology to know in real time precisely what data should be in cache at any moment in time and the relative importance of the entries already in the cache.  The goal is to ensure that the data maintained in the cache results in the maximum benefit possible to reduce Read I/O traffic. 

So, there you have it.  I hope this deeper dive explanation provides better clarity to the benefit and internal workings of Diskeeper, V-locity and SSDkeeper as it relates to I/O performance and memory management.

You can download a free 30-day, fully functioning trial of our software and see the new dashboard here: www.condusiv.com/try

Which Processes are Using All of My System Resources?

by Gary Quan 17. July 2018 05:50

Over time as more files and applications are added to your system, you notice that performance has degraded, and you want to find out what is causing it. A good starting point is to see how the system resources are being used and which processes and/or files are using them.

Both Diskeeper® and SSDkeeper® contain a lesser known feature to assist you on this. It is called the System Monitoring Report which can show you how the CPU and I/O resources are being utilized, then digging down a bit deeper, which processes or files are using them.

Under Reports on the Main Menu, the System Monitoring Report provides you with data on the system’s CPU usage and I/O Activity.

 

The CPU Usage report takes the average CPU usage from the past 7 days, then provides a graph of the hourly usage on an average day. You can then see at which times the CPU resources are being hit the most and by how much.

Digging down some more, you can then see which processes utilized the most CPU resources.

 

The Disk I/O Activity report takes the average disk I/O activity from the past 7 days, then provides a graph of the hourly activity on an average day. You can then determine at which times the I/O activity is the highest.

Digging down some more, you can then see which processes utilized the I/O resources the most, plus what processes are causing the most split (extra) I/Os.

 

You can also see which file types have the highest I/O utilization as well as those causing the most split (extra) I/Os.  This can help indicate what files and related processes are causing this type of extra I/O activity.

 

So, if you are trying to see how your system is being used, maybe for performance issues, this report gives you a quick and easy look on how the CPU and Disk I/O resources are being used on your system and what processes and file types are using them. This along with some other Microsoft Utilities, like Task Manager and Performance Monitor can help you tune your system for optimum performance.

Dashboard Analytics 13 Metrics and Why They Matter

by Rick Cadruvi, Chief Architect 11. July 2018 09:12

 

Our latest V-locity®, Diskeeper® and SSDkeeper® products include a built-in dashboard that reports the benefits our software is providing.  There are tabs in the dashboard that allow users to view very granular data that can help them assess the impact of our software.  In the dashboard Analytics tab we display hourly data for 13 key metrics.  This document describes what those metrics are and why we chose them as key to understanding your storage performance, which directly translates to your application performance.

To start with, let’s spend a moment  trying to understand why 24-hour graphs matter.  When you, and/or your users really notice bottlenecks is generally during peak usage periods.  While some servers are truly at peak usage 24x7,  most systems, including servers, have peak I/O periods.  These almost always follow peak user activity.  

Sometimes there will be spikes also in the overnight hours when you are doing backups, virus scans, large report/data maintenance jobs, etc.  While these may not be your major concern, some of our customers find that these overlap their daytime production and therefore can easily be THE major source of concern.  For some people, making these happen before the deluge of daytime work starts, is the single biggest factor they deal with.

Regardless of what causes the peaks, it is at those peak moments when performance matters most.  When little is happening, performance rarely matters.  When a lot is happening, it is key.  The 24-hour graphs allow you to visually see the times when performance matters to you.  You can also match metrics during specific hours to see where the bottlenecks are and what technologies of ours are most effective during those hours. 

Let’s move on to the actual metrics.

 

Total I/Os Eliminated

 

Total I/Os eliminated measures the number of I/Os that would have had to go through to storage if our technologies were not eliminating them before they ever got sent to storage.  We eliminate I/Os in one of two ways.  First, via our patented IntelliMemory® technology, we satisfy I/Os from memory without the request ever going out to the storage device.  Second, several of our other technologies, such as IntelliWrite® cause the data to be stored more efficiently and densely so that when data is requested, it takes less I/Os to get the same amount of data as would otherwise be required.  The net effect is that your storage subsystems see less actual I/Os sent to them because we eliminated the need for those extra I/Os.  That allows those I/Os that do go to storage to finish faster because they aren’t waiting on the eliminated I/Os to complete.

 

IOPS

IOPS stands for I/Os Per Second.  It is the number of I/OS that you are actually requesting.  During the times with the most activity, I/Os eliminated actually causes this number to be much higher than would be possible with just your storage subsystem.  It is also a measure of the total amount of work your applications/systems are able to accomplish.

 

Data from Cache (GB)

Data from cache tells you how much of that total throughput was satisfied directly from cache.  This can be deceiving.  Our caching algorithms are aimed at eliminating a lot of small noisy I/Os that jam up the storage subsystem works.  By not having to process those, the data freeway is wide open.  This is like a freeway with accidents.  Even though the cars have moved to the side, the traffic slows dramatically.  Our cache is like accident avoidance.  It may be just a subset of the total throughput, but you process a LOT more data because you aren’t waiting for those noisy, necessary I/Os that hold your applications/systems back.

Throughput (GB Total)

Throughput is the total amount of data you process and is measured in GigaBytes.  Think of this like a freight train.  The more railcars, the more total freight being shipped.  The higher the throughput, the more work your system is doing.

 

Throughput (MB/Sec)

Throughput is a measure of the total volume of data flowing to/from your storage subsystem.  This metric measures throughput in MegaBytes per second kind of like your speedometer versus your odometer.

I/O Time Saved (seconds)

The I/O Time Saved metric tells you how much time you didn’t have to wait for I/Os to complete because of the physical I/Os we eliminated from going to storage.  This can be extremely important during your busiest times.  Because I/O requests overlap across multiple processes and threads, this time can actually be greater than elapsed clock time.  And what that means to you is that the total amount of work that gets done can actually experience a multiplier effect because systems and applications tend to multitask.  It’s like having 10 people working on sub-tasks at the same time.  The projects finish much faster than if 1 person had to do all the tasks for the project by themselves.  By allowing pieces to be done by different people and then just plugging them altogether you get more done faster.  This metric measures that effect.

 

I/O Response Time

I/O Response time is sometimes referred to as Latency.  It is how long it takes for I/Os to complete.  This is generally measured in milliseconds.  The lower the number, the better the performance.

Read/Write %

Read/Write % is the percentage of Reads to Writes.  If it is at 75%, 3 out of every 4 I/Os are Reads to each Write.  If it were 25%, then it would signify that there are 3 Writes per each Read.

 

Read I/Os Eliminated

This metric tells you how many Read I/Os we eliminated.  If your Read to Write ratio is very high, this may be one of the most important metrics for you.  However, remember that eliminating Writes means that Reads that do go to storage do NOT have to wait for those writes we eliminated to complete.  That means they finish faster.  Of course, the same is true that Reads eliminated improves overall Read performance.

% Read I/Os Eliminated

 

% Read I/Os Eliminated tells you what percentage of your overall Reads were eliminated from having to be processed at all by your storage subsystem.

 

Write I/Os Eliminated

This metric tells you how many Write I/Os we eliminated.  This is due to our technologies that improve the efficiency and density of data being stored by the Windows NTFS file system.

% Write I/Os Eliminated 

 

% Write I/Os Eliminated tells you what percentage of your overall Writes were eliminated from having to be processed at all by your storage subsystem.

Fragments Prevented and Eliminated

Fragments Prevented and Eliminated gives you an idea of how we are causing data to be stored more efficiently and dense, thus allowing Windows to process the same amount of data with far fewer actual I/Os.

If you have our latest versions of V-locity, Diskeeper or SSDkeeper installed, you can open the Dashboard now and select the Analytics tab and see all of these metrics.

If you don’t have the latest version installed and you have a current maintenance agreement, login to your online account to download and install the software.

Not a customer yet and want to checkout these dashboard metrics, download a free trial at www.condusiv.com/try.

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