Condusiv Technologies Blog

Condusiv Technologies Blog

Blogging @Condusiv

The Condusiv blog shares insight into the issues surrounding system and application performance—and how I/O optimization software is breaking new ground in solving those issues.

When It Really NEEDS To Be Deleted

by Dawn Richcreek 26. October 2018 04:53

In late May of this year, the European Union formally adopted an updated set of rules about personal data privacy called the General Data Protection Regulation. Condusiv CEO Jim D’Arezzo, speaking with Marketing Technology Insights, said, “Penalties for noncompliance with GDPR are severe. They can be as much as 4% of an offending company’s global turnover, up to a total fine of 20 million.” 

A key provision of GDPR is the right to be forgotten, which enables any European citizen to have his or her name and identifying data permanently removed from the archives of any firm holding that data in its possession. One component of the right to be forgotten, D’Arezzo notes, is called “right to erasure,” which requires that the data be permanently deleted, i.e. irrecoverable.

Recently, the EU government has begun cracking down on international enterprises, attempting to extend the EU’s right-to-erasure laws to all websites, regardless of where the traffic originates. Many affected records consist not of fields or records in a database, but of discrete files in formats such as Excel or Word. 

So to stay compliant with GDPR—which, the EU being the world’s largest market and twenty million euros being a lot of money—you need to be able to delete a file to the point that you can’t get it back. On the other hand, files get deleted by accident or mistake all the time; unless you want to permanently cripple your data archive, you need to be able to get those files back (quickly and easily).

In other words, you need a two-edged sword. For Windows-based systems, that’s exactly what’s provided by our Undelete® product line. Up to a point, any deleted file or version of an Office file can be easily restored, even if it was deleted before Undelete was installed.

If, however—as in the case of a confirmed “right to erasure” request—you need to delete it forever, you use Undelete’s SecureDelete® feature. Using specific bit patterns specified by the US National Security Agency, SecureDelete will overwrite the file to help make it unrecoverable. A second feature, Wipe Free Space, will overwrite any free space on a selected volume, using the same specific bit patterns, to clear out any previously written data in that free space.

So with Undelete, you’re covered both ways. Customers buy it for its recovery abilities: you need to be able to hit the “oops” button and get a file back. But it can also handle the job when you need to make sure a file is gone.

 

"No matter how redundant my backups are, how secure our security is, I will always have the one group of users that manage to delete that one critical file. I have found Undelete to be an invaluable tool for just such an occasion. This software has saved us both time and money. When we migrated from a Novell Infrastructure, we needed to find a solution that would allow us to restore ‘accidentally’ deleted data from a network share. Since installing Undelete on all my servers, we have had no lost data due to accidents or mistakes."
–Juan Saldana II, Network Supervisor, Keppel AmFELS Juan Saldana II,
Network Supervisor, Keppel AmFELS

 

For Undelete help with servers or virtual systems, click Undelete Server

To save money with Undelete on Business PCs, click here Undelete Professional

You can purchase Undelete immediately online or download a free 30-day trial.

Tags:

File Protection | File Recovery | General | Undelete | Windows 7 | Windows 8 | Windows Server 2012

Help! I hit “Save” instead of “Save As”!!

by Gary Quan 19. June 2018 06:30

Need to get back to a previous version of a Microsoft Office file before the changes you just made?  Undelete has you covered with its Versioning feature.

Have you or your users ever made some changes to a Word document, Excel spreadsheet, or a PowerPoint presentation, saved it and then realized later that what was saved did not contain the previous work? For example, and a true story, a CEO was working on a PowerPoint file he needed for a Board of Directors presentation that afternoon. He had worked about 4 hours that morning making changes and he was careful to periodically save the changes as he worked. The trouble was the last changes he saved had a large part of his previous changes accidentally overwritten.  The CEO then panicked as he just lost a majority of the 4 hours of work he just put in and was not sure he could redo it in time for his presentation deadline. He immediately called up his IT Manager who indicated the nightly backups would not help as they would not contain any of the changes he made that morning. The IT Manager then remembered he had Undelete installed on this file server. This was mainly to recover accidentally deleted files, but he recalled a Versioning feature that would allow recovery of previous versions of Microsoft Office files. He was then able use Undelete to retrieve the previous version of the CEO’s PowerPoint presentation and recover the work he did that morning. The CEO was extremely happy, and the IT Manager was a ‘hero’ to the CEO!

Another very common scenario is users making edits to original files and then selecting “Save” instead of “Save As” and then the original files are now gone. As an example, a customer had a budget file in Excel and several people had accessed it throughout the day. At some point, someone had inadvertently made multiple changes to it for his department, including deleting sections that were not relevant to his department all the while thinking he was working in his own Save-As copy. Boy, were the other department heads upset! The way our IT Admin customer tells the story it sounded like a riot was about to erupt! Well, he swoops in just in time and recovers the earlier version in minutes and saves the day. We hear stories daily about Word document overwrites that IT Admins are able to recover the previous versions of in just a few minutes, saving users hours of having to recreate their work.

While the most popular functionality of Undelete is the ability to recover accidentally deleted files instantly with the click of a mouse, the Undelete Versioning feature is certainly the runner up, so we wanted to remind users, or prospective users, that it’s also here to save the day for you, too.

The Undelete Versioning feature will automatically save the previous versions of specific file types, including Microsoft Office files. The default is to save the last 5 versions, but this is settable.  Undelete then allows you to see what and when versions were saved and are then easily recoverable. A vital data protection feature to have.

If you already have Undelete Server installed on your file servers, check out the Versioning feature. If you have any of your own “hero” stories you would like to share, email custinfo@condusiv.com

If you don’t have Undelete Server or Undelete Pro yet, you can purchase them from your favorite online reseller or you can buy online from our store http://www.condusiv.com/purchase/Undelete/

 

Tags:

Data Protection | Data Recovery | File Recovery | General | Success Stories | Undelete

How to Recover Lost or Deleted Files BEFORE Resorting to Outsourced Data Recovery

by Gary Quan 1. November 2017 05:46

Here’s a nightmare scenario…a user accidentally deletes irreplaceable or valued files from a network share, and there is no way to recover the data because:

>The file was created or modified then deleted AFTER the last valid backup/snapshot was taken.

>There is NO valid backup or snapshot to recover the data.

>There was NO real-time recovery software like Condusiv’s Undelete® already installed on the file server

>Sending the disk to a professional data recovery center is COSTLY and TIME-CONSUMING.

What do you do? Well, you may be in luck with a little known feature in Condusiv’s Undelete software product known as “Emergency Undelete.” On NTFS (New Technology File system) formatted volumes, which is the default file system used by Windows, there is an unfamiliar characteristic that can be leveraged to recover your lost data.

When a file gets deleted from a Windows volume, the data has not yet been physically removed from the drive. The space where that file data was residing is merely marked as “deleted” or available for use. The original data is there and will remain there until that space is overwritten by new data. That may or may not happen for quite a while. By taking the correct steps, there is an extremely good chance that this ‘deleted’ file can still be recovered. This is where Emergency Undelete comes in.

Emergency Undelete can find deleted files that have not yet been over-written by other files and allow you to recover them. To increase your chances of recovering lost data, here are some best practices to follow as soon as the files have been accidentally deleted.

1. Immediately, reduce or do away with any write activity on the volume(s) you are trying to recover the deleted files from. This will improve your chances of recovering the deleted files.

2. Get Condusiv’s Undelete to leverage its Emergency Undelete feature.  Emergency Undelete is part of the Undelete product package.

3. REMEMBER: You want to prevent any write activity on the volume(s) you are trying to recover the deleted files from, so if you are trying to recover lost files from your system volume, then do one of the following:

a. Copy the Undelete product package to that system, but to a different volume than the one you are recovering lost files from. Run the Undelete install package and it will allow you to run Emergency Undelete directly to recover the lost files.

  

b. If you do not have an extra volume on that system, then place the Undelete product package on a different system, run it and Emergency Undelete will allow you to place the Emergency Undelete package onto a CD or a USB memory stick. You can then place the CD/Memory stick on the system you need to recover from and run it to recover the lost files.

 

 

Now if the lost files do not reside on the system volume, you can just place the Undelete product package on the system volume, run it and select to run Emergency Undelete directly to recover the lost files.

4. When recovering the lost files, recover them to a different volume.

These same steps will also work on FAT (File Allocation Table) formatted storage that is used in many of the memory cards in cameras and phones. So, if some irreplaceable photos or videos were accidentally deleted, you can use these same steps to recover these too. Insert the memory card onto your Windows system, then use Emergency Undelete to recover the lost photos. 

Emergency Undelete has saved highly valuable Microsoft Office documents and priceless photos for thousands of users. It can help in your next emergency, too.

 

Tags:

Data Protection | Data Recovery | Undelete

Undelete Can Do That Too?

by Gary Quan 30. August 2017 04:46

You may have already heard countless customers tout the file recovery features of Condusiv’s Undelete® and how IT Pros use it as a recycle bin on file servers for real-time protection, so they don’t have to dig through backups to recover deleted or overwritten files. Although this is Undelete’s primary function, Undelete provides more than just this. 

What most people do not know is that Undelete also provides features to keep your data secure and visibility into who deletes files from file servers.

When a file is deleted, many assume that file data is now safe from being seen by others. Not so fast. When data gets deleted on a Windows volume, the data does not get removed. The space where that file data was residing is just marked as available for use, but the original file data is still there and will remain there until that space is overwritten by some other file data. That may or may not happen for quite a while. This means, that ‘deleted’ file data could still be potentially read. 

So, what do you do if you really want your file data gone when you delete it?  Undelete has the answer with two features. The first feature is “SecureDelete.”  When a file is deleted, SecureDelete will first over-write the file to help ensure it is unrecoverable. In fact, this is done by overwriting it with a specific bit pattern specified for this purpose by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) for the Department of Defense (DOD).  The second feature is “Wipe Free Space”, which will overwrite any free space on a selected volume, using the same specific bit patterns as SecureDelete to clear out any previously written data in that free space.

Now, with these two features, when you delete a file, you know it is now virtually impossible to read/recover any of that data from that volume.

Along with file security, there are customers using Undelete as another precautionary security: check how many files are being deleted from file shares and by whom. If they ever detect an abnormal, substantially high number of files being deleted, that raises a flag for them to investigate further.

Although Undelete is usually purchased to recover files, others use it to securely delete files and track back any deleted files to the person who did it.

Tags:

Data Protection | File Protection | Undelete

Help! I deleted a file off the network drive!!

by Robin Izsak 31. October 2013 08:01

What if the recycle bin on your clients could be expanded to include file servers? And what if you could enable your users to recover their own files with self-service recovery? You would never have to dig through backups to restore files again, or schedule incessant snapshots to protect data.

One of the most persistent—and annoying—help desk calls is to help users recover files accidentally deleted off network drives, or support users who ‘saved over’ a PowerPoint they need for a meeting—in 15 minutes.

There are some pretty serious holes in true continuous data protection: First, any data that was created between backups might not be recoverable. Second, who wants to dig through backups anyway? Third, you’d have to schedule an insane amount of snapshots to protect every version of every file. Fourth, the Windows recycle bin doesn’t catch files deleted off a network drive, which is how most of us work in the real world—networks, clouds—not local drives.

Check out our latest guide that explains the gap between backup and the Windows recycle bin, and how to bridge that gap with Undelete® to ensure continuous data protection and self-service file recovery.

Meet the recycle bin for file servers. You’re welcome.

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