Condusiv Technologies Blog

Condusiv Technologies Blog

Blogging @Condusiv

The Condusiv blog shares insight into the issues surrounding system and application performance—and how I/O optimization software is breaking new ground in solving those issues.

Guests from Que Publishing and Diskeeper Corporation will appear on Radio Talk Show Let's Talk Computers

by Colleen Toumayan 15. April 2011 04:08

Jeremy Buck, Spokesperson for Diskeeper Corporation, in this series on "How to Speed up your Business Computers," continues his discussion on virtualization, talking about why you need a program like V-locity ®, virtual platform disk optimizer, to keep your virtual computers running at peak performance.

The full release is located here.

Let's Talk Computers ranks as one of the longest-running computer radio talk shows and can be heard weekly in 7 states and 24 hours a day on the website.

Tags:

virtualization | V-Locity

Storage VMotion and GOS fragmentation

by Michael 3. December 2010 06:57

I had a test run here internally in order to make a point about what does, or more specifically "does not", happen when you VMotion/SVMotion a Windows Guest OS (GOS). We wanted to demonstrate that, while VMware is copying the VM to another host/storage, it does nothing about the internal fragmentation of files in Windows.

We felt this was a valuable demonstration as one of the old (1980s) ways to "fix" fragmentation was to copy off the files/backup, reformat the volume, and then copy back/restore. This offered a degree of success, but required taking the data offline in order to get rid of most of the fragmentation. On a side note, backing up/copying fragmented files takes a lot longer than it would on contiguous and ordered files.

Anyway, S/VMotion is such a cool feature because it works on live VMs. So, if the VMDK movement somehow did align/reorder files in Windows, it could be a great solution to Windows file system fragmentation! So here's how we tested...

1. Setup 2 ESX 4.1 Servers with iSCSI storage and vCenter with SVMotion capability.

2. Create a VM with Windows 7 in one of the ESX Server storage (Ex: Storage1) and a 20 GB Thin virtual disk.

3. Using an internal tool, create moderate fragmentation on the virtual disk (80k fragments, average fragments per file around 3.0, around 50% free space).

4. Install V-locity with all features (e.g. defrag, IntelliWrite, etc...) disabled. This is just so we can run a fragmentation analysis and save the reports.

5. Save the "Before SVMotion" analysis report, and then stop V-locity Windows Service (to make sure it is entirely inactive).

6. Using SVMotion move the live VM to the other ESX Server storage (Ex: Storage2).

7. Once the move is completed, restart the V-locity Windows Service and perform a post "After SVMotion" analysis.

8. Save this job report.

We saw what we expected, given VMotion leverages Changed Block Tracking (CBT) technology and is block, not file based. I attached the report, so you can see the side-by-side analysis data, files in Windows are not defragmented in an SVMotion. Now, that's not to say possible fragmentation of the VMDK files themsleves (on VMFS datastores) was not affected, but that's a topic for another post. 

Diskeeper Corporation to Exhibit V-locity 2.0 Virtual Platform Disk Optimizer at Interop New York 2010

by Colleen Toumayan 20. October 2010 04:50

Diskeeper Corporation, innovators in performance and reliability technologies®, today announced that it is going to be presenting its V-locity™ 2.0 virtual platform disk optimizer solution at Interop New York 2010.  

Location: Interop New York 2010

Date:  October 20th and 21st, 2010

Booth: 725

Venue: Javits Convention Center, New York, New York 

Key to seminars and discussions at Interop New York will be Virtualization. Virtualization is being rapidly adopted because it can lower the cost and increase the flexibility of IT infrastructure.  A new white paper, The Importance of Defragmentation in Virtual Environments, co-authored by Osterman Research and Diskeeper Corporation, demonstrates that virtual environments require defragmenting even more than physical environments. This is due to the fact that virtual environments support multiple operating systems and create a higher intensity of disk activity.

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20101020006635/en

V-locity support for ESXi, Xen, Oracle and more

by Michael 4. October 2010 09:09

Early in 2011 we'll have a new release of V-locity that will enhance support for virtualization platforms, including those from Citrix, Oracle, and more. While V-locity 2.0 is in use on Windows guests running on these platforms today (and we do recommend it over using Diskeeper), this release will also provide our revolutionary InvisiTasking technology to ensure invisible optimization of guest disk I/O traffic without the need to schedule maintenance tasks.

If you are interested in field testing, we expect to begin in the next couple of months.

Tags: , , ,

InvisiTasking | virtualization | V-Locity

New White Paper Urges Defrag for Virtual Environments

by Colleen Toumayan 27. September 2010 09:27

A new white paper, The Importance of Defragmentation in Virtual Environments, co-authored by Osterman Research and Diskeeper Corporation, demonstrates that virtual environments require defragmenting even more than physical environments. This is due to the fact that virtual environments support multiple operating systems and create a higher intensity of disk activity. 

“The need for defragmentation is even more acute in virtual environments,” the white paper states. “This is because physical hardware in a virtualized storage environment must support more operating systems and so can undergo even more disk access and more stress than in a non-virtualized environment. Further, disk I/O in one virtual machine has a cascading effect on disk I/O in other virtual machines, and so the problem of excessive disk I/O in virtual machines is, in fact, even worse than what would be experienced in a physical disk environment.” 

The white paper indicates that fragmentation, which reduces system performance in a physical storage infrastructure, can even create more of a performance loss in a virtual storage infrastructure. Virtual disks can become fragmented over time just like the physical disk or disks on which they reside. The result is a fragmented virtual disk on a fragmented physical disk—or fragmentation within fragmentation.  This data is especially important in light of the rapid growth of virtual environments. Organizations are particularly interested in virtualization due to its many benefits, which include reduced hardware costs, ease of adding additional capacity to existing infrastructure, ease of administration and maintenance, and simplified migration from one server to another.  Because of the complexity of I/O traffic in virtual environments, simple defragmentation is not enough to fully address the fragmentation issue. For that reason, Diskeeper Corporation has developed new technology for virtual environments, found in their V-locity™ 2.0 virtual platform disk optimizer. A recent product release for VMware and Hyper-V, V-locity 2.0 is the first optimizer that truly eliminates the barriers to full virtual efficiency. V-locity 2.0  employs IntelliWrite™ and InvisiTasking® technologies to both prevent a majority of fragmentation in the first place and to efficiently coordinate VM resources when defrag is running invisibly in the background. The complete white paper is located here.

Month List

Calendar

<<  September 2017  >>
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
28293031123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
2526272829301
2345678

View posts in large calendar